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 Asimina triloba Scions? 
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Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:43 am
Posts: 3
Location: Aloha, OR
Post Asimina triloba Scions?
Greetings!

I have a Wilson Paw Paw and wondered if it is too late for grafting or budding here in Oregon. I missed the scion exchange due to prior commitments. Is there any way to obtain some other scion varieties?

Also, has anyone had any success grafting other species in this genus (such as A. obovata or incana) onto an A. triloba ?

Thanks,
Philip


Last edited by HittMan on Sat Apr 08, 2006 8:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:02 am
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1147
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
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Philip;

I wonder if we had any Paw Paw scions at the Exchange..? I stopped short of planting Paw Paw's due to the heat they apparently need to ripen fully (at my place), and the fact you need both a male and female tree...

I'd doubt very much if you could locate any 'still dormant' scion wood ... most Paw Paw trees are pretty far from here... Have you ever looked over Craig's List? http://portland.craigslist.org/ --- Look in the "Discussion Forums" and click on Garden. I've led some of 'them' here, and the discussion's seem to span the nation! There's a lot of info coming up from the Bay Area; it's a blast to read about stuff far too exotic for us up here... Post your question there!

If you can get some 'Fresh' bud wood later this summer, and your tree's not too old (with bark too thick to Bud) - and of course - a variety you'd want, that might work...? If not, at least get the word out so as to procure some scion wood for next year.

As far as cleft, or 'splice' grafting right now ... from my experience, the tree should be dormant, and I'm sure the sap's flowing by now... If your bark is 'thick' - and you can locate some dormant wood - a bark graft might be your best bet..? Don't know how I missed your question here, maybe the "Asimina Triloba" threw me! And believe me - I'm not trying to answer everything!! ... just trying to help :)

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Sat Apr 08, 2006 7:07 pm
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Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:43 am
Posts: 3
Location: Aloha, OR
Post 
Hi Viron:

Thanks for the post. I figured that scions for Paw Paw might be few and far between here. I do know that they will fruit here some years - I saw some with fruit at Hoyt's Arboretum last year and there's a home just a couple of miles from me here in Aloha with a couple of trees that give fruit. If One Green World can grow 'em, then I can (I hope).

I believe that with Paw Paws it's not so much that you need a male and female, but rather that although there are male and female parts on the same flower, they are fairly incompatible.

http://www.ars-grin.gov/ars/PacWest/Cor ... ml#culture

That's probably why you never see them differentiated as male or female. In addition to the Wilson, I also have a Mango Paw Paw (very small).

When I originally posted, my tree still looked like it was dormant. But not in the last couple of days. There is a lot of good material for grafting as many of the branches are still pencil-thick. (Sigh) Maybe next year.

Thanks,
Philip


Sat Apr 08, 2006 8:21 pm
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1147
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
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Philip; After my post ... I wondered some if it was a male & female needed, or just two different varieties...? I first seen, and tasted Paw Paw's in the orchard of an HOS Member, Ron Smith. I think his 'complaint' was that he only got fruit from one of his two trees, and said he, "Needed the second for pollination" .... I apparently took that wrong, my mistake :oops: I wasn't very impressed with the fruit he gave me, but then again, I may have eaten them too early --- he suggested I wait a week or two -- I was too curious and impatient. I remember the seeds being quite large. And, this was around 15 years ago ~

That was a very interesting website; I hope we continue to 'select' and promote more consistently productive and superior varieties --- "Fossils which closely resemble A. triloba are found in New Jersey and date to the late mioscene [Miocene?]; others found in Colorado, Mississippi, Texas, and Wyoming date to the eocene." Fascinating :shock:

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Sat Apr 08, 2006 10:58 pm
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