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 Rootstock Dormancy Question 
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Joined: Mon Mar 06, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Northeastern California
Post Rootstock Dormancy Question
I have a feeling that I already know the answer to this, but I'll ask anyway..
Is it possible to successfully graft onto a rootstock that has broken dormancy?

If not, should I plant out the rootstock for next year?

Thanks for any responses!

M.


Sun Apr 09, 2006 3:49 pm
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Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 9:12 am
Posts: 21
Location: Western Washington
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I think you can still graft- in fact, you want your rootstock to be further out of dormancy than your scion wood.

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Terry M.
Sunset Zone 4, USDA Zone Zone 8a


Sun Apr 09, 2006 5:20 pm
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Joined: Mon Mar 06, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Northeastern California
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Thanks for the quick response! (and for telling me what I'd wanted to hear..) To successfully graft on these leafing rootstocks, do I need to trim down further than normal? (they are emla111, if this makes a difference)

Thanks again!

M.

In cold and dreary Zone 6


Sun Apr 09, 2006 6:06 pm
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Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 9:12 am
Posts: 21
Location: Western Washington
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I would graft as usual, but cut off any rootstock sprouts- send the energy into the scion.

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Terry M.
Sunset Zone 4, USDA Zone Zone 8a


Sun Apr 09, 2006 7:22 pm
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Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:23 pm
Posts: 95
Post Rootstock dormancy
M.
It makes no difference whether the rootstock is dormant or actively growing. It is the scion than MUST BE DORMANT. If you miss the timing in the spring, you can alway bud graft in late July or early August. HOS will have a budding workshop Aug. 5 at the HOS arboretum.
Ted


Wed Apr 12, 2006 10:13 pm
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Joined: Mon Mar 06, 2006 1:46 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Northeastern California
Post 
Thank you for the good advice. The scions are in my fridge, waiting for the rest of the rootstock to arrive - and - a sunny day.
It would be interesting to try another type of grafting. I wonder if some areas produce better results with bud grafting, as many new trees and perennial plants do better when they are planted in the Fall, rather than Spring. (Plus, July/August seems a lot less busy than early Spring..)

Thanks again~

M.


Sat Apr 15, 2006 5:27 pm
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