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 Anna and Dorsett maybe Fuji 
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Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 11:08 am
Posts: 59
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Karl,

Crab apples are another species of the genus Malus to which the apple belongs just like a Japanese plum is related to an European plum, they both belong to the genus Prunus.

Pears tend to suffer in areas of warm/hot springs. That's why they do so well in the Pacific Northwest. We have cool springs. Peaches like warm springs and they suffer here in the PNW. I know they grow apples in southern Brazil and the climate there is similar to the southern United States, but not as humid as Austin. Austin is more humid than southern Brazil. I saw a lot of Golden Delicious being grown there in the high elevations. You just may have to try a few varieties and see how they perform.

Marc Camargo
fruit-tree.com nursery
Visit us at http://www.fruit-tree.com
Our motto: "Preservation by dissemination"


Mon Dec 25, 2006 10:39 am
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Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2006 9:55 pm
Posts: 80
Location: Riverside, Southern California USDA Zone 10a
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Marc:

Dorsett Golden, Anna, and Williams' Pride are all self-fertile. The nursery will tell you to plant another "low chill" variety along with it for heavier crops, which is silly as you have to thin 4/5ths of the apples off anyway. Do not look to your local nursery for current information or cutting-edge advice; like farmers, they have to make a living and cannot afford to fail and thus will stick to tried-and-true varieties. Even if they know an apple tree will fruit they still have to try to sell that to the skeptical public that still thinks otherwise.

Like wine grapes apples definately have "vintages", some years better than other, and it is unwise to judge an apple from just one year. I've been bad-mouthing Anna as being inferior until this blazing summer, when the flavor and texture was outstanding for some reason. At the same time the usually bomb-proof Dorsett Golden was absolutely mushy and tasteless, the exact opposite of last summer. But even in the best apple-growing regions lose a whole crop now and then to late frosts or blight, and so we can't really complain if a year is disappointing here. This is also a good reason to plant a large variety of apples (systems redundancy in engineering terms) so that if one fails, another probably will not.

We don't really look at it as pushing the envelope, as apple-growing is easy here; just dig a hole in the ground and stick the tree in it. We have no pests or disease and do not spray, no killing frosts to worry about, no deer, and we graft and prune whenever we want. If I didn't know better I'd call apples a warm-climate fruit and laugh at the silly people trying to grow them in the frigid and disease-ridden Northeast and Canada where whole regions are wiped out like the Baldwin orchards in the 1930's.

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Kevin Hauser
Kuffel Creek Apple Nursery
Riverside, Southern California
USDA Zone 10a


Mon Dec 25, 2006 7:19 pm
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Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2006 9:55 pm
Posts: 80
Location: Riverside, Southern California USDA Zone 10a
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Rescue, Chestnut, Whitney, and Trancendent crabapples are one of the first varieties to drop their leaves here in Southern California, indicating that they are well-adapted to our conditions. It seems the more "wild" the variety the better it adapts. Most of the Russian apples like Red and White Astrachan do well in hot climates, as does the ultra-hardy apples like Wealthy.

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Kevin Hauser
Kuffel Creek Apple Nursery
Riverside, Southern California
USDA Zone 10a


Tue Dec 26, 2006 8:28 pm
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Joined: Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:32 am
Posts: 15
Location: South Louisiana
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Ok
I am firming up my decision to plant Williams’s pride, but I like what I have read about Enterprise, Freedom and Pristine. Also Molly delicious is a close runner up. What are your opinions on these verities?
Thanks for being so patient with me.
Karl


Wed Dec 27, 2006 2:57 pm
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Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2006 9:55 pm
Posts: 80
Location: Riverside, Southern California USDA Zone 10a
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I can't vouch for Freedom, but Enterprise and Pristine are from the same folks at PRI that developed Williams Pride and are outstanding choices for both quality and disease-resistance. Mollies Delicious, unrelated to Red Delicious, is an excellent early apple but I have not heard of any special disease resistance bred into it.

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Kevin Hauser
Kuffel Creek Apple Nursery
Riverside, Southern California
USDA Zone 10a


Wed Dec 27, 2006 6:58 pm
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