View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Wed Oct 22, 2014 1:02 am



Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 
 Honeybee and bumble bee challenges 
Author Message

Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1354
Location: Portland, OR
Post Honeybee and bumble bee challenges
The Oregonian covered a story from the New York Times today that covered a couple of studies about the effects of pesticides called neonicotinoids and bees. One study from French researchers showed that the pesticides fogged the bees' brains, making it harder for them to find their way home. Does disappearing sound familiar?

Another study from Britain showed the pesticides made it difficult for bumblebees to bring home enough food for their queen.

Bayer, the maker of the pesticide, predictably stated that we don't know what causes colony collapse disorder or other bee problems.

The article stated that there are other factors, such as mites and habitat loss.

It is interesting to think about when governments decide that the evidence has accumulated enough for them to make a decision about the effects of pesticides.
John S
PDX OR


Fri Mar 30, 2012 10:20 pm
Profile

Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:42 pm
Posts: 188
Post Re: Honeybee and bumble bee challenges
Michael Phillips, in his book which is practically a Bible for organic growers, to his credit (and in my recollection) was not big on nicotine products for use in the orchard. I am not sure how many people use them. Phillips correctly raised the issue that organic growers should maybe think less about whether a product was "natural" (like nicotine?) or whether it was "synthetic" and look more on how destructive the materials are to the environment and how the products break down after their use. Some synthetic products are actually good for the orchard. He points out that most organic growers drive a tractor which burns up fossil fuels and would not give up their tractors.
In other words, this guru of organic apple production thinks maybe in some cases we shouldn't just accept a product because it is "natural" and/or reject it, per se, because it is synthetic.
I will re-check this book when I get a chance but I think that's what he was saying and I definitely think it is a concept worth considering.


Sat Mar 31, 2012 12:20 pm
Profile

Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1354
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: Honeybee and bumble bee challenges
I agree. What are footies made of? Plastic? Not natural, but the effect they have on the plants is the key issue. They do kind of mimic the hairs that peaches, quince, fuzzy kiwi and some other fruits have to deter bugs. Or they are like the outer peel that an avocado, orange, etc. has.
John S
PDX OR


Sat Mar 31, 2012 9:24 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 3 posts ] 

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: