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 too late to layer hazelnut? 
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Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2011 8:37 pm
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Post too late to layer hazelnut?
i was wondering if anyone had experience layering hazels? i know early spring is best but can i still do it successfully now?


Mon May 21, 2012 5:36 pm
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 5:24 pm
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Location: Puyallup, WA
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
I do some layering of filberts/hazelnuts. Might be a little late to expect layering starts for transplant this fall. I prepared mine over the winter, staking down a couple dozen branches on two different trees. Even if the layering attempts don't have much root on them this fall you could cover the branch up again, leave it for next year, and have a bigger transplant for fall of 2013.


Sun May 27, 2012 8:32 pm
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Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:28 pm
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Location: Willamette Valley near Scio
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
I have taken unrooted suckers from hazels in the fall, stuck them in dirt and had about 20% success with them rooting and growing the next summer. Suckers had a bit of orange color to them at the bottoms probably due to being etiolated or something.

I'd like to hear more about ground layering filberts, though, as Fig is the only one I do that with.


Fri Jun 29, 2012 4:14 pm
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 5:24 pm
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Location: Puyallup, WA
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
I just take a low branch on the filbert tree, dig a shallow trench where I can make the branch meet the ground, put the branch in the trench, cover with sod or soil, place a rock on top or drive in stakes to hold down the branch, then prop up the outside end with another stake.

I had some luck this year with rooting of cuttings. I pruned the filbert tree mid-winter, cut the prunings into 14" lengths and stuck them in the dirt in the garden without any rooting hormone. Got about 10% take. Nothing ventured, nothing gained I figure.


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Sat Jun 30, 2012 4:43 pm
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Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:21 pm
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Location: SW Washington
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
Do any of you actually harvest hazelnuts? How do you keep the squirrels from eating them all?

I've never really seriously considered growing nuts, but apparently I have a number of wild hazelnuts growing on the property so it must be suitable for them. I've never noticed any nuts.

Are hazelnuts amenable to grafting? Do they require spray or special care to get a harvest?


Mon Jul 02, 2012 9:24 am
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Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:28 pm
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Location: Willamette Valley near Scio
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
Dubyadee wrote:
I just take a low branch on the filbert tree, dig a shallow trench where I can make the branch meet the ground, put the branch in the trench, cover with sod or soil, place a rock on top or drive in stakes to hold down the branch, then prop up the outside end with another stake.

I had some luck this year with rooting of cuttings. I pruned the filbert tree mid-winter, cut the prunings into 14" lengths and stuck them in the dirt in the garden without any rooting hormone. Got about 10% take. Nothing ventured, nothing gained I figure.

Sounds very much like what I do with figs to propagate them quickly. Usually I get the branches pinned to the ground with rocks or bricks before the leaves come out.

What date do you layer these filberts?

Thanks for the idea!


Tue Jul 03, 2012 11:14 am
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Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:28 pm
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Location: Willamette Valley near Scio
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
jafarj wrote:
Do any of you actually harvest hazelnuts? How do you keep the squirrels from eating them all?

I've never really seriously considered growing nuts, but apparently I have a number of wild hazelnuts growing on the property so it must be suitable for them. I've never noticed any nuts.

Are hazelnuts amenable to grafting? Do they require spray or special care to get a harvest?

I ran into two really nice kinds while gathering nut-clusters for the All-About-Fruit-Show one year. I could crack them with my hands easily, and they had big tasty nuts inside that filled a person up fast, when hungry!

Spent a few years getting them over to my property etc, but now have some that are 6 feet tall, and throwing their own little pups from the bottoms, so they kind of self propagate in that manner. Never tried grafting them, but have heard that it needs to be done in hot weather. I wouldn't really worry about grafting over your wild ones, but they might produce some useful wild pollen for nut making, as some cultivars are pretty fussy about what kind of pollen they get. I think Dr. Melenbacher said their are 29 different kinds of pollen combinations. Wild is probably useful.

Had a few ripe nuts last fall from potted plants. Sure to get better over time.


Tue Jul 03, 2012 11:21 am
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Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:28 pm
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Location: Willamette Valley near Scio
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
Dubyadee wrote:
I do some layering of filberts/hazelnuts. Might be a little late to expect layering starts for transplant this fall. I prepared mine over the winter, staking down a couple dozen branches on two different trees. Even if the layering attempts don't have much root on them this fall you could cover the branch up again, leave it for next year, and have a bigger transplant for fall of 2013.

That answers my question! Thanks for the info!


Tue Jul 03, 2012 11:24 am
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Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:28 pm
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Location: Willamette Valley near Scio
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
Dubyadee wrote:
I pruned the filbert tree mid-winter, cut the prunings into 14" lengths and stuck them in the dirt in the garden without any rooting hormone. Got about 10% take. Nothing ventured, nothing gained I figure.

I found that fig branches root wildly better when planted horizontally in the ground under and inch of soil. Nothing above ground to dessicate!

My theory is that it is 100% humid and very warm in such shallow soil, as the sun strikes it in April and May. Perfect rooting conditions. I have even had 2 trees develop from one cutting, one from each end. Just dig in winter and cut into two seperate units.

I wonder if your filbert cuttings, held over in moist refrigeration, would respond the same way to humidity, heat and such in April and May? I might have to run a trial of such next spring.

Why did you decide on 14 inch lengths?

Thanks!


Tue Jul 03, 2012 11:30 am
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Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:21 pm
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Location: SW Washington
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
I don't recall seeing nuts at the All About Fruit Show, but maybe I just didn't care enough at the time to notice.

Plumfun, if you run out of space for your pups I can help you out :)


Tue Jul 03, 2012 12:10 pm
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 5:24 pm
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Location: Puyallup, WA
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
I chose 14" because of the spacing of the leaf nodes, I wanted so many nodes above the ground and so many below.

Last week I started some "air layering" of my Desert King fig. The branches didn't reach the ground. I put some stakes in the ground, cut a slit in the side of some gallon pots, inserted the fig branches, screwed the pots to the stakes, and filled with soil. Thought I might get quicker, larger potted fig trees this way.


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Wed Jul 04, 2012 9:46 am
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
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Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
Great idea on the pot-layering method. I hope to hear an update.

Jafarj-

I agree that squirrels steal almost all of them. I have harvested them as early as August and eaten them. I don't know if that affects the nutrition. About late August, they become frenzied and by October when they're supposed to be ready, there are almost none left.That's my only part/not very good solution.
Sorry,
John S
PDX OR


Sat Jul 07, 2012 10:35 pm
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Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:28 pm
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Location: Willamette Valley near Scio
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
Dubyadee wrote:
Thought I might get quicker, larger potted fig trees this way.

It helps if you can keep the soil moist-ish. You will certainly get nice trees the way you did it.

I once did the same model, only used a yogurt cup of soil. Was trying to establish new roots that did not contain nematodes. The mother plant was nematode city. Worked real well! I think it only took a month plus or minus to get the dirt all rooted through, but alas, that exact cultivar is meant only for Southern Cal, not the Northwest.

I still think I'll try some horizontally buried filbert stems next spring. When they are in a 1 inch deep trench covered with soil it is harder for them to dry out, plus the sun really warms them up fast.

Thanks for your ideas!


Wed Jul 11, 2012 5:07 pm
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Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:28 pm
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Location: Willamette Valley near Scio
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
jafarj wrote:
I don't recall seeing nuts at the All About Fruit Show, but maybe I just didn't care enough at the time to notice.

Plumfun, if you run out of space for your pups I can help you out :)

Not sure if HOS carries nut samples every single year. Those which I collected were at the Corvallis filbert repository, so my partner and I got to see a whole spectrum of what looked good in theory, and what was delicious and edible right then and there. Valuable experience!

Jafar, I should be able to spot you a baby rooted one of each next scion event (March?).


Wed Jul 11, 2012 5:11 pm
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Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 11:28 pm
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Location: Willamette Valley near Scio
Post Re: too late to layer hazelnut?
I have seen filbert trees that were not let go to sucker without cleaning the bottoms every year, they look pretty nice (tree form) with a little elbow grease every winter. Left to their own devices they would be a large bush. Trees are tidier looking, plus you can put some sort of squirrel guard at the bottom to keep pests out of trees, not so easy when it is a bush form.

Most of Corvallis' trees are single trunks.


Wed Jul 11, 2012 5:14 pm
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