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 questions about Ambrosia apples 
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Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 4:44 pm
Posts: 9
Post questions about Ambrosia apples
I am looking for information on Ambrosia apples.
Does anyone know what their hardiness zones are?
Also, can anyone tell me if scions of Ambrosia will be available at the upcoming exchange? (I am hoping to put together a single tree with fuji, honeycrisp, and ambrosia.)

As a side note: can you graft an apple and a pear onto the same rootstock?

THANKS!
AJ


Sat Feb 10, 2007 4:03 pm
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Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2006 9:55 pm
Posts: 80
Location: Riverside, Southern California USDA Zone 10a
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Sorry, Ambrosia is protected under plant patents in the US and Canada, which means you cannot propagate it or grow it without permission.

You can find out more on the variety at http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/treefrt/product/ambrosia.htm

You didn't state your zone, but some varieties are incompatible on multi-graft rootstocks. You usually get better results by grafting each tree on its own dwarfing rootstock.

You cannot graft a pear onto apple rootstock (sorry again).

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Kevin Hauser
Kuffel Creek Apple Nursery
Riverside, Southern California
USDA Zone 10a


Sat Feb 10, 2007 6:45 pm
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Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 4:12 am
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It doesn't preclude you from creating the tree you desire. If you can obtain scionwood on your own, or obtain an Amrosia tree and graft onto it, it's a go. It's just that the Ambrosia invention is protected from unliscenced distribution. As such, distributing scionwood through the HOS wouldn't be Kosher. Developing new varieties takes time and costs money, and this is a very real issue for inventors. They want to be paid. When you commercially reproduce their plants, or distribute scionwood, and they don't get paid, they sue. Note. Honeycrisp also seems to be protected. New varieties generally are.


Tue Feb 13, 2007 5:13 am
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Pome News Editor

Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:23 pm
Posts: 95
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Just fo rthe record:'Ambrosia'
Chance seedling discovered in the late eighties by Wilfred Mennell near Keremeos, British Columbia, Canada. Patent Status: Patented. Canadian PBR #0388, USPP #10789. The seedling tree was found in a cultivated plum orchard previously planted to `Golden Delicious’ and `Starking Delicious.’ Hardy USDA Zones 4 to 9.
Ted


Wed Feb 28, 2007 3:59 pm
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Joined: Wed May 09, 2007 9:18 am
Posts: 111
Location: Corvallis, Oregon USA
Post apple and a pear onto the same rootstock
And also for the record -
I ran into some info on the web while searching for info about apple interstems about grafting pears onto apple rootstock; there seem to be plenty of people doing it. No personal experience, but there was one guy posting in another gardening forum about it his extensive personal experience with grafting dissimilar cultivars onto trees. And also other places, most mentioned that the key was using a Winter Banana apple interstem between the apple and the pear. Some references to OSU (think that was Ohio State U, not my local Oregon State U!) having had 10 pears all on apple rootstock for 10 years or so; before they were ripped out to make room for another experiment.
Cheers!
Dave


Wed May 30, 2007 10:50 am
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
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Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
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I've grafted a pear onto a Winter Banana apple, so it works both ways. I removed the tree shortly thereafter so never seen it fruit, but I still have the pictures.

What's the point of grafting a pear onto an apple ... or vice versa? I did it because I'd read it could be done - and was a lot younger.

One combination I'd hoped would work was European Hazel nuts (aka Filberts) grafted onto our native 'Hazel brush.' I tried it several times but they never took. It would have been a quick and relatively easy way to establish a lot of Filberts...

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Wed May 30, 2007 10:28 pm
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Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 417
Location: SW Washington
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Viron, the point of grafting apple onto pear and vice versa is that its really cool, it can be done, and some of us are stilll young :)

I've heard that Fertility pear is also compatible with some apples.


Thu May 31, 2007 10:24 pm
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