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 JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA 
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Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2012 12:25 am
Posts: 4
Location: Yamhill County, OR.
Post JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
I am attempting to grow a Fuyu, (Jiro) persimmon in Yamhill County. Haven't seen any mature trees anywhere around. Does anybody know of any persimmon success stories or know where there is a Jiro growing near Portland area?
Also growing four "Sochi" Tea seedlings. (Camellia sinensis). They are going on second winter outdoors in appx. 7gal. containers. They were languishing until I replanted them into a great potting mix recipe I found on line. I would like to compare notes with anybody raising Tea plants if there are any of you out there.
Thanks.


Mon Nov 26, 2012 1:03 am
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1154
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
Post Re: JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
Fruit bat (love yur name),

I am attempting to grow a Fuyu, (Jiro) persimmon in Yamhill County. Haven't seen any mature trees anywhere around. Does anybody know of any persimmon success stories or know where there is a Jiro growing near Portland area?

I’m in Yamhill County and have had Fuyu (Jiro) persimmons for ..many years. ‘Many years’ being well over twenty for my oldest – that died this Spring :cry: I’ve a smaller fruited astringent persimmon with a name I can’t remember (and am too lazy to go out and look.. though I did eat a couple of them off the tree this evening!), and one more Jiro, around 15 years old – down from 3 total as I took one out a year ago for serious garden expansion and it was not looking too good…

The demise of the oldest tree seemed a combination of its wet location and severe vole activity below ground. The other (younger) Jiro was likely the same, planted in the same little ‘draw,’ just a bit further up. And the vole damage has been deadly…

Magnificent trees, they are very brittle; limb spreading can easily snap a ‘weak crotch.’ They need no pollinator and usually set good crops. I’m in a cool draw at 350 feet elevation and ripening is sometimes ‘iffy.’ They’re the last fruit I harvest …well, them and my Fuzzy kiwis. No insects eat or attack their leaves, though deer will eat whatever’s within reach - so mine spent 3 to 4 years caged in until they grew above that threat. They have no seeds and may be eaten from crunchy through soft. They dry well, I’ve got gallons. Birds will begin to ‘peck’ them after the leaves fall, which is after the first ‘killing frost’ – though the fruit will hang on for weeks, it looks amazing. Raccoons are hard on them, as they’ll break the brittle limbs when climbing to the top after anything you leave (for the birds..).

The tree’s seem naturally dwarfed and need very little pruning …and being an avid pruner, I’d be happy to get in there if needed. No sprays are necessary for any disease or pests. The tree’s have done well after some very cold winters. Once established, they show no signs of thirst – and you know it also gets dry around here. The fruit can get some one-sied blackened sun-scald when exposed; no big deal unless you’re looking to market them.

I’ve seen some persimmon trees in McMinnville, generally ‘new,’ but always green and growing – they’ve a beautiful ‘lime-green’ foliage in the Spring and an eventual orange through purple going on in the Fall. I can’t say enough good about them, they’re a very underutilized if unknown tree and do very well in our dryer than the Valley or foothills of the Cascades climate. I’ve been waiting to see an orchard go in for decades ... but it’s not going to be me …you?

Hey – if you’re in Yamhill County, you can get a free library card from Linfield College (don’t tell everyone) and check out an amazing ..make that AMAZING DVD on persimmon cultivation, harvesting, storage and marketing in Japan of around 25 years ago. A full-length ‘movie,’ it’s riveting for anyone into Persimmons. It was once quite an industry over there and I suspect they’re still at the hart of anything commercial. It’s said persimmons (you’ve got me going now..) are the most eaten fruit on earth, due to the number of Asians and their cultivation and appreciation of them. So we’re real late to the game. – And I always need to thank Jim Gilbert of “One Green World” for inspiring me to grow them …all those years ago.. His online nursery would be an excellent source… or Kramer’s in Mac 8)

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Mon Nov 26, 2012 7:15 pm
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1355
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
One sees many Asian persimmon trees in the Portland area. As Viron says, they are trouble free. I grew Izu but moved. I prefer American persimmons, so I mostly grow them. I agree that they are criminally undergrown. They are also an excellent source of diversity, not being related to ROse family fruits.

I grow tea plants. I had grown one variety called "Maiden's BLush". As you might guess, the flower was pink, but it attracted disease and died quickly. Regular white flowered tea has grown easily for me for years, trouble free. I made tea with it once. It was very good. I grew my current one off of a cutting from the original plant at the other house, so you could propagate from cuttings.
John S
PDX OR


Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:47 pm
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Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2012 12:25 am
Posts: 4
Location: Yamhill County, OR.
Post Re: JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
Thanks, John. I haven't harvested any leaves for the beverage yet but have thoroughly enjoyed the beauty of the plants and their clean white flowers. I do intend to start some cuttings once I decide which of the seedlings I would most like to clone.
Thanks again.


Mon Nov 26, 2012 10:49 pm
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Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2012 9:30 am
Posts: 78
Location: Springfield, OH Zone 6a
Post Re: JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
Hey Viron, you've got me interested in persimmons now and I had a question about them. I've only tasted a store bought Fuyu persimmon once and it honestly didn't taste very good. It was very juicy, but it lacked much flavor, other than a subtle hint of cinnamon. Are persimmons much more flavorful right off the tree?


Wed Nov 28, 2012 9:06 am
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1154
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
Post Re: JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
Sohoppy, it’s so difficult to describe their flavor. Fuyu’s can be eaten crunchy or soft or anywhere in-between, and each stage has a lightly different flavor, if not texture. To me, they’ve more ‘flavor’ than an average apple... I like their mid-ripened flavor best, and they’re not too juicy at that point. I’ve never thought of them as “juicy,” though waiting until an astringent (Hachiya) persimmon becomes eatable would come closer.

…honestly, my mouth is watering at this moment as I consider booting up and heading out to the tree - that might answer your question :P I’d also assume, like most other fruit, they’re not ‘tree ripened’ in a store. I suspect there’s an extra richness that develops when they’re left to hang to that moment of perfection.

Given my druthers, I wouldn’t be without one. The fruit keeps well refrigerated, too. I’d gladly trade all three of my winter pear trees (Comice, Highland & Anjou) for persimmon trees. Though the pears are delicious, they’re impossible for a home orchardist’s (lacking an oxygen free environment) to ripen without brown rot. Larger Asian persimmons keep for months and ripen well when set out for a week.

If you like fruit, which is likely why most of us are here, I can’t see how you’d not like a tree-ripened persimmon.

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Wed Nov 28, 2012 6:30 pm
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Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2012 12:25 am
Posts: 4
Location: Yamhill County, OR.
Post Re: JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
For me it has to be the crunchy texture while being so smooth at the same time. The flavor is just sweet and well..........Persimmony. I love fruits with tartness but the Jiro Fuyu persimmon has none of that.
They are pest and disease resistant and highly ornamental. They are easy to dehydrate and are very delicious that way too.

They actually taste even better than I realize since I am a smoker.

Is anybody having any success raising Jujubes in the NW Oregon area?


Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:13 am
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Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2012 9:30 am
Posts: 78
Location: Springfield, OH Zone 6a
Post Re: JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
Yeah, I'm sold. I figured the lack of flavor in the Fuyu I tried was due to its storage period. I've definitely got to get a couple American persimmons next Spring. I'd love to grow some of the Asian varieties too, but I'm in zone 5 to 6-ish. What American varieties would you recommend for best taste? And by the way, there hasn't been a fresh fruit I've not enjoyed.


Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:33 am
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1355
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
My favorite American persimmon is Garrettson, but I've liked all of the selected varieties. The selected ones are much better than the native, but I like the random native seedlings too. You may have some native ones growing around your area. I've also heard that Yates and Prok are very good.
John S
PDX OR


Thu Nov 29, 2012 8:53 am
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Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2012 9:30 am
Posts: 78
Location: Springfield, OH Zone 6a
Post Re: JIRO PERSIMMONS AND SOCHI TEA
Thanks, John. I personally haven't noticed any wild persimmons in my area, or actually any wild anything, with the exception of honeysuckle, but not the edible kind either. I'm sure they're around here somewhere though. But there unfortunately seems to be a dearth of fruit growing in central Ohio and possibly the rest of the state for that matter, though I can't speak for it personally. There's no equivalent to the HOS here and it seems like most people in my area are more concerned with growing vegetables. It's the curse of being in the midwestern corn belt I guess. I hope that one day I can change that mentality around here.


Fri Nov 30, 2012 9:03 pm
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