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 Data for codling moth control? 
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Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2007 4:23 pm
Posts: 33
Location: Monmouth Oregon
Post Data for codling moth control?
I've looked around, but can't find local data for figuring out when to treat for codling moths. Does anyone know where Polk County Oregon (Willamette Valley) data can be obtained or where I can simply find "canned" spray dates? It seems like most of the Valley will have similar spray timing, at least for similar elevations.

I'm new to Oregon and new to fruit tree growing (Asian pears, peaches and nectarines).

Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

Frank


Sun Apr 01, 2007 4:40 pm
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Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:23 pm
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Frank:
Codling mo0ths will infect Asian pears but noy peaches or nectarines.
Each microclimate is a little different than most others so here is a way to come close to treatng codling moths, either spary or with nylon footies.
1. Set out a phermone trqap for codling moths at or just befor first bloom
2. Noe date when first male isw trapped, this is the time to start calculating or at least estimating degree days (DD)
3. DD are calculated by adding high + low temp = sume divided by 2 = x, x -50 = DD
(example: high 70 + low 50 = 120 divided by 2 = 60. 60 - 50 = 10DD)
4. once 243 DD have accumulated the buggers are readey to mate at twilight IF...
5. twilight temp. is 60?F or better, (not tonight, baby it's cold outside) and its not raining
6. you need to have your footies on the fruit or the spray on the fruit
Once mating has occured she will lay eggs on leaves near the fruit, starting at the top of the tree. Egg will hatch and within 48 to 72 hours the larva will migrate into the clayx (bloom end of the fruit. If using spray make sure you spray the end of the fruit.


Wed Apr 11, 2007 10:34 pm
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Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2007 4:23 pm
Posts: 33
Location: Monmouth Oregon
Post Data for codling moth control?
Thanks, Ted, but that's exactly the reason I was asking for a different source of data to start spraying.

I found it hard to believe that, given codling moth damage's cost to the fruit industry, there isn't a databank of local weather/spray conditions for this pest here in the Willamette Valley and I was right!

http://ippc2.orst.edu/cgi-bin/ddmodel.pl is a link to a website that does the calculation with all the parameters setup and weather data from +/- local stations and outputs the predicted emergence specific for codling moths/larvae among many others. I expect this could be very useful for your members.

It turns out that no emergence is expected before the middle of next month. Had I known this, I wouldn't have put out my traps *last* month and wasted that money.

Thanks for your reply and the push that it gave me to re-do the web research I'd done before posting and lucking onto this OSU webservice.


Thu Apr 12, 2007 9:52 am
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Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:23 pm
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FRank:
I may repeat may self, landed on wrong key and evereything fanished. The problem with calendar spraying is that the weather varies so much fro year to year. All insects, diseases and plant devlopment are temperature controlled. In the codling moth case there is a very short window wqhen sprays will be effective. (See comment on peach leaf curl).


Wed May 02, 2007 8:22 pm
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Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:23 pm
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Frank
Caught my first male codling moth on May 7. Starting degree day count to 243 when they will be reqady to mate if…weather is satisfactory (i.e., no rain, twilight temp. at 60?F or above. Ted
PS Just read a research article on codling moth traping using pear esters, the chemicals that pears emitt when ripening. The gist of the article was that the traps using esters did not work well in 'Bartlett' pear orchards because the pears were giving off esters (oders) so that he codling moths could not find the traps. If wonder if I were to hang a tangle foot coated 'Bartlett' pear in my orchard if it would attract and trap codling moths. I bought a 'Bartlett' yeaterday. AND the pears attract BOTH male and female codling moths!!!!!!! :lol: :P :D


Fri May 11, 2007 9:47 am
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