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 Can I graft a second scion. . . ? 
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Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2006 4:44 pm
Posts: 9
Post Can I graft a second scion. . . ?
I just had four trees created for me at the scion exchange - can I have another scion grafted onto a newly grafted tree either this year or next? I had really wanted two types on one tree, but was unable to find the specific ones I wanted.

THANKS!


Thu May 03, 2007 10:52 pm
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1146
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
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AJ, unless one of them grows like wild, enough so that you could Bud (graft) it in August - you'd have to wait until "bench grafting" time next year. I've never Budded, just haven't had a need; but it's by far the least invasive method of grafting, and doesn’t leave a gaping wound if unsuccessful.

The strongest limbs are budded directly to the trunk, but if you plan to leave the remainder of the tree (above the inserted bud), you'll have to make sure it gets the sunlight it needs to prosper; or it may simply form a fruit spur and not a limb.

You could also (as I've done) allow the tree to grow two years; this will give you a branched tree. Make a whip & tongue graft on one or two of its established limbs, a few inches out from the trunk. That's worked well for me as it removes the 'competition' of light robbing limbs, replacing them with a new limb/s. And, that 'splice' becomes plenty strong...

The one thing about trees, or plants in general -- you've got be patient and work at their speed – not yours :wink:

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Fri May 04, 2007 9:15 am
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Joined: Mon May 10, 2004 1:00 pm
Posts: 203
Location: SE Portland
Post August bud grafting
Viron, I asked this question at the tail end of my last wail (my dead child crabapple), but no one has responded yet.

I'm going to want to basically change one of my new dwarf trees to a significantly taller tree, and the quickest way I imagine I can do that is to take a bud from the one that's now on M9 and move it to an M111 rootstock.

I know nothing about bud grafting and don't remember the growth pattern/rate of my surviving grafted tree. Am I likely to have new - I guess they have to be new, because original buds have already become little branches - buds on the scions grafted at this year's scion exchange? And I'm assuming there will be rootstock available in August...

Thanks,

mh


Sat May 05, 2007 11:33 am
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1146
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
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Marsha; you'd like a larger / taller tree in place of your young crab (baby) that didn't make it? I've been told that if you plant any rootstock deeper than the graft union - it will root; resulting in a 'Standard' - or full-sized apple tree. …I'd actually mounded up the surrounding clay soil around one of my trees with hopes it would root -- but haven't dug around it to find out... ...If you were to plant the graft union of one of your new M9's 5 or 6 inches below the soil line, it would become as big a tree as you let it … or so I'm told.

As far as 'harvesting' buds from your newly grafted apples: you need mature buds for budding, those would be furthest 'down' the new shoots of this years growth. As you'd 'top' the terminal buds on those new shoots to create a branched (vase shaped) tree, you'd need your mature buds to form those branches (next season). You also have to gouge out, or carve off a bud from a 'bud stick;' in this case you'd be carving into and making a serious wound on the 'trunk' of your young tree :?

Though I've not Budded (bud-grafted) either, I know the HOS holds a "Budding Workshop" at our Arboretum, I believe it's in August. The great thing is - I suspect - you've got buds from every variety in the Arboretum to choose from! And in this case, you'd be carving them off the very 'water shoots' that would be removed by pruning - therefore not harming the trees.

Now I'm a bit confused as to what you'd be putting them on... but I hope this is a start :wink:

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Sun May 06, 2007 10:49 am
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Joined: Mon May 10, 2004 1:00 pm
Posts: 203
Location: SE Portland
Post 
The crab was on M111, and its practical apple function was to be a pollinizer. For the house, it was a landscape tree. I really want a landscape tree, but since I don't really have room for all the apple trees I've started, I'm going to grow an apple I can't pick. (And I think it's going to be my Grimes Golden, because supposedly those apples tend to drop when they're ripe. Maybe I'll set up a net to catch them...)

What still seems odd to me is that the cambium of what I consider to be a dead crabapple is still green, above and below the graft. I have not yet, as Ted suggested, dug it up and inspected the roots. Maybe it's just coasting on stored energy; without leaves, it's not going to get any more.

I don't think I'll trust the life in that rootstock enough to graft to it in August. I also don't think I want to bury the existing baby and produce a standard - M111 is already big, and this will be very close to two houses. Probably tick the neighbor off even more. I expect I'll be starting an entirely new tree. Anyone want a Grimes Golden on M9? I'll have an extra lovely little tree in a couple of months...

mh


Sun May 06, 2007 9:21 pm
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