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 Grafted Orcas pear 
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Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:29 am
Posts: 15
Location: SW Portland
Post Grafted Orcas pear
I got an Orcas pear grafted onto a quince rootstock (to keep it small) at the HOS fruit tree activity in the spring. It was grafted on the spot by one of the grafting experts working the show.

It has not done well. It was planted shortly after I got it. It has grown several leaves below the graft, which I pinched off. It has had two small (one inch length) leaves above the graft for months now. There has been no other growth.

Any ideas?


Wed Jun 13, 2007 12:19 pm
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Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 417
Location: SW Washington
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I don't know whether that is unusual or not for a bench graft of pear on quince. Do you know that it should be performing differently than that, or are you just suspicious? I'm assuming that the dwarfing you hope to get from the quince rootstock in order to "keep it small" results in reduced vigor.

I got a quince rootstock at the HOS sponsored grafting class. I'm assuming its the same type of stock they used at the Scion exchange. I later collected some scion wood from a friend's Pineapple quince and grafted it onto the stock myself.

After planting it out a bud opened and a clump of leaves maybe 1" or so long opened up and then it proceded incredibly slowly for at least a month until the warm spell a couple of weeks ago. Now it seems to be putting on some growth and is maybe 4 or 5 inches long. I've been pinching off the growth from the rootstock and from the other buds on the scion since I'd like to grow a single trunk.

I'm assuming that it took some time for the roots to get growing and for the graft union to "marry" and that things will really pick up from here. I wouldn't rule that out for your tree either, unless there are other symptoms adding to your concern that you haven't mentioned.

I'm assuming that you have the tree in a sunny location, that you are watering deeply, aren't letting the soil dry out completely but also aren't keeping it soaked, and that you've cleared the area a couple of feet in diameter or more around the tree you've kept free of competion from weeds and other plants. Mulching of course helps with several of those things.


Wed Jun 13, 2007 2:53 pm
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Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:29 am
Posts: 15
Location: SW Portland
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Yes, sunny, clear, mulched, watered but not too much. Yes, I got it from the Scion Exchange.

I'll keep waiting'!

Tahnks for responding.


Wed Jun 13, 2007 4:26 pm
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Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 417
Location: SW Washington
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kelly,

I just grafted a piece of Orcas onto my sister's European pear tree yesterday. I got the scion from the HOS exchange. If you're interested, and I don't do so unsolicited, remind me to let you know how it does.

The scions had been in storage for quite some time, but I just finally got a chance to use them. Some of the plums and apples I grafted in the last few weeks seem to be doing fine.


Mon Jun 18, 2007 3:55 pm
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Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:29 am
Posts: 15
Location: SW Portland
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Yes, please let me know. Right now I have some new leaves below the graft (again) and the two leaves about the graft don't seem to have grown, beyond the original 1 inch.


Mon Jun 18, 2007 4:59 pm
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
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Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
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Kelly, I've held off commenting on this, hoping your patient's does the trick :wink: . Did you have any other grafts done, or only this one? If so, how are they doing in comparison? I generally hand out an aftercare sheet with my grafts, do you remember being offered one?

On that sheet I recommend not to instantly remove any leaves below the graft. All leaves help feed the tree, and after a couple 'sets' of leaves you can simply pinch out the terminal growth to keep it from 'taking off.' I've watched some grafts languish as you've described, for some reason (for me) they're usually on a cleft graft of an established tree. Sometimes they just peter out... Other times they'll survive and eventually give you the limb (or tree) you want.

If there's a connection at all between the rootstock and scion it should be enough to feed the scion's growth. Only with bench-grafted Persimmon's have I had a consistent 'delayed growth.' But they eventually took off and are now trees!

It's hard to give you a suggestion... but if you don't get any more growth on the scion, let anything on the rootstock take off. Care for and protect it as you would 'the real thing,' then bring it (potted) back next March to our event and see if we can't do it again - for free! (tell someone I sent you 8) )

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Fri Jun 22, 2007 8:06 pm
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Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:29 am
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Location: SW Portland
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Hi Viron,

I don't remember being given an instruction sheet. I think I would have remembered instructions to leave the leaves below the graft alone. The pear was the only graft I had done.

There seem to be more leaves coming from below the graft, which I will leave there. The two leaves above the graft haven't changed.


Sat Jun 23, 2007 7:31 am
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
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Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
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For the record, here's my aftercare advice: viewtopic.php?t=273

I've watched failed grafts do as you've described - but, those two 'little leaves' soon wilt, dry and die - long before this. Sounds like they're hanging in there... Strange, that's a viable combination; there shouldn't be an incompatibility factor. And science says if only one cell meets from either side, that's enough to mesh.

At least the rootstock's still pushing. I'd let it grow (as you are) until the scion shows more activity. If it does, pinch the tip out on the rootstock shoot. If not, let that 'shoot' feed the roots and form a 'graftable trunk.' We could then graft onto that, or slice the rootstock below the graft and do another... If there's anything to luck - I wish it the best :wink:

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Sat Jun 23, 2007 10:00 am
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Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:29 am
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Location: SW Portland
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Thanks for the aftercare sheet, Viron, and your advice.

Kelly


Sat Jun 23, 2007 1:19 pm
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Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 417
Location: SW Washington
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Well Kelly, its been another 3 weeks of summer since your original post. Has the pear put on any more growth? My quince shoot is probably a foot long now.


Tue Jul 03, 2007 1:30 am
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Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:29 am
Posts: 15
Location: SW Portland
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Not the pear. The leaves did not completely unfold and there's been no change for months. The quince is putting out leaves, though. And I am leaving them and let the rootstock grow for another graft next year.


Tue Jul 03, 2007 11:35 am
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