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 ripening times 
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Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:42 pm
Posts: 188
Post ripening times
I have been kind of hoping that this forum will be a way to exchange info on when we can expect to see the pests that plague our fruit in the Pacific Northwest on any given year. I would also like to exchange info on when some of the better known fruit varieties can be expected to ripen. I know there are a million and one micro-climates and so any info given out has to be extremely general in nature, but I think at least it is more useful for a West of the Cascades Washington or Oregon resident to talk about it than, say, to listen to when Minnesota harvests their Honeycrisp apples. I know this: that the bugs have been early and abundant this year and that the ripening times of the fruit have also been early...... about two weeks early to be exact this year. What I don't know is this: I have two Honeycrisp apples on dwarfing rootstock....my first Honeycrisps......I guess I can look at background color, but I don't wish to cut open one apple and see whether the seeds are white or not....and I don't have a pressure gauge......so when will it be ripe in all probability without my cutting it open? And are others harvesting their Bartlett pears right now as well? Thanks.


Tue Aug 27, 2013 7:32 pm
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Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2010 9:43 pm
Posts: 35
Location: SE PDX
Post Re: ripening times
I had been thinking of starting a topic along the lines of "what are people harvesting now" which is sort of related to your question. Yesterday I saw someone tossing a bunch of tree fallen pears into the yard debris bin. I had been by the house a week earlier and stopped to look at the pears on the ground....they were shaped like Bartletts but I don't know for sure they were Bartlett. On the Asian pear front, I have harvested a number of Chojuro Asian pears which seems a little earlier than I remember last year. The Shinseiki variety is also coming along as well and I even had an Olympic Giant fall from the tree yesterday. I hope the Olympic Giants don't ripen too soon though since I'd rather store them on the tree a bit longer! According to the ripening chart at Raintree, Honeycrisp would normally ripen in October so this may still be a bit early.


Wed Aug 28, 2013 8:08 pm
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Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 421
Location: SW Washington
Post Re: ripening times
Don,

Its been a couple of years since I paid attention, but I think one of the things I look for to help judge if a particular Honeycrisp apple is ripe is to look at the background color near the stem. As it gets riper I think the green gets more yellowish.


Thu Aug 29, 2013 8:44 am
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1375
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: ripening times
I agree with the general topic. I posted about this a month or so ago.

Most of my fruits have been early, some have not. Asian plums on time, but they are in a more shady area than earlier. They still fruit heavily. That's why I put them in 1/2 shade.

Cherries were early. Blackberries not particularly, but again shady spot. Asian pears not early. Normally Shiseiki ripens mid to late August. I picked one in mid august and it was too early. One fell off a couple of days ago and it was good. Chojuro not ripe yet.

I picked an Akane apple yesterday because it was not covered with any protection. They grow in such fierce clumps that I skipped one. It was delicious with full flavor and brown seeds.

I agree with Jafar that background color is often a good detector of ripeness and change. I have a couple of Conference pears that fell off. They'd changed colors and fell due to codling moth.
John S
PDX OR


Thu Aug 29, 2013 10:15 am
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1166
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
Post Re: ripening times
I’ve seven fig trees; 5 Desert Kings and 2 Brown Turkey; they are definitely early this year. I’d estimate at least two weeks, perhaps 3 weeks. It’s easy to gage this as I begin giving them away at the school district I work for …and have only a few Brown Turkey’s left …and lots of expectant staff!

Though I’ve a number of other varieties of fruit, this is definitely the earliest my figs have ripened in the last ..20 years. In fact, though ‘up in the hills,’ I may for the first time get a ‘second crop’ – come on Indian Summer :P

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Thu Aug 29, 2013 4:16 pm
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1166
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
Post Re: ripening times
Well, it’s the ‘following year’ from my last post -- and we had an even longer ‘summer!’ In fact, this is the first time I’ve had a second crop of figs ripen! They’re my Brown Turkeys. I’ve eaten about 25 of them …while various insects have eaten that many more.

It’s a race with the mold though; after the rain we’ve had, any break in their skin appears to start the mold process. But if they’re checked daily, some can be harvested at the peak of their second-crop perfection. No, they’re not like they were in mid-August, but they’re sweet & tender!

I’m higher than Portland or the Valley floor… and my mother in Portland had a second crop (for the first time) on her Desert King fig tree, so maybe there’s a number of you lowlanders enjoying your second crop 8) …but here in the hills of Yam, after twenty plus years in, it’s my first :P

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Mon Oct 20, 2014 6:06 pm
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1375
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: ripening times
Yes, Viron,
I wrote an article in the Pome News about this last year. This is the second year that I've had a second harvest on our Desert King figs. Makes sense when you realize that we live in a desert-4 inches of rain during this week alone :)
John S
pDX OR


Fri Oct 24, 2014 9:19 pm
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1166
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
Post Re: ripening times
Got my persimmons harvested a couple days ago, something I put off until the coldest of weather. Strange, this having been a great growing year, with amazing pollination, neither of my two persimmon varieties set well. Generally, amid some of the poorest fruit set for other trees, the persimmons sill set heavy…

Anyway, the ones that formed were larger than normal and the seemingly long summer allowed them to ripen well. For such beautiful, compact, disease and insect resistant, self-pollinating rich seedless fruit … I know of no other trees beyond my two… :|

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Thu Nov 13, 2014 11:16 am
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1375
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: ripening times
Many people here in the PNW grow persimmons. MOst grow the Asian persimmon. I used to grow them, but I am currently growing the American persimmons. I did try to bud Saijo into my AM PERS tree. We'll see how that works out.

With the extra heat this year, I was eating American Persimmons starting in late September, earlier than ever, and I still have two fruits on my GArretson tree, which is smaller than I am. I had a huge harvest this year. Except for Meader and Szukis, Americans need male and female. I think in general persimmons are tragically undergrown in W. Oregon. Persimmons are supposed to be a great attractant to insects so pollination should be good normally.

Persimmons are a productive, delicious, pest and disease free tree. No Brainer in my opinion if you like them. Hard to buy American persimmons.
John S
PDX OR


Sat Nov 15, 2014 10:27 pm
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