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 whip graft onto hazelnut tree 
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Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2004 8:50 am
Posts: 12
Location: seattle
Post whip graft onto hazelnut tree
Late March, 2004 I tried, without success to whip graft several hazelnut scions onto 7 year old hazelnut trees. I followed the same technics that have been very successful with apple, pear and stone fruit grafts.
Can hazelnut be whip grafted with good success and if so what is the best time of the year to graft?


Mon Dec 27, 2004 9:14 am
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Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2004 4:30 pm
Posts: 16
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Hmm... I not sure, but I do know a friend of mine says the best solution to hazelnut pest problems is a chainsaw used at ground level :D


Mon Jan 03, 2005 2:48 pm
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Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 11:08 am
Posts: 59
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Hazelnuts are very difficult to whip graft. If there is a good time to graft it would be in the spring. The success rate is low. The preferred method of propagation for hazelnuts is layering in special beds.

Marc Camargo
fruit-tree.com nursery
Visit us at http://www.fruit-tree.com
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Wed Jan 12, 2005 9:44 am
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:27 pm
Posts: 1162
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
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In my "hey days" of grafting I was determined to graft over some native hazelnut trees to Commercial "Filberts." The wood was good, the eyes (mine) were good, the grafts were too; but not one "took." I'd tried cleft grafting, not whip & tongue, but as the cleft graft had worked on everything around my homestead, I figured "Hazel nuts" were simply a different Animal!

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Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:45 pm
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Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2004 8:50 am
Posts: 12
Location: seattle
Post whip graft onto hazelnut tree
My reseach indicates that the lack of heat to heal the graft wound inhibits whip grafting success in natural conditions. Don Blazer, from Mt. Vernon, Wa. tells me that nut trees need a constant minimum of approx. 80 degrees F. for the graft wound to heal. Nut tree grafting can be successful using artificial heating, the area of the new graft is placed in a heat tube until the wound heals over. I'm not sure how long this takes or the ideal time of the year to use this technique.


Fri Jan 28, 2005 7:25 am
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