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 Red fleshed apple varieties 
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Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:03 pm
Posts: 11
Post Red fleshed apple varieties
I am a total fruit lover and grow all kinds of different stuff in the Portland area. I really like the odd ball stuff. The red fleshed apple to me is pretty fun looking. I've started growing some of those varieties but I don't have many - maybe four varieties. I've tried the Scarlet Surprise, and to my surprise it was very tasty and crisp. The research I did seemed to say that the red fleshed apples were not that good. Anyone have any opinon on this? What varieties of red fleshed apples do you grow? Interior pictures would be fun also. I'll try to figure out posting pictures here and I'll post some of mine as well. Have a good day!


Sun Nov 24, 2013 10:42 am
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1314
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
I have a grenadine. I got it at the HOS scion exchange/fpf. I like it. It's biennial, so none produced this year. They are supposed to be super high in antioxidants, ie very healthy. Fight cancer.
John S
PDX


Sun Nov 24, 2013 11:50 am
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Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 5:01 pm
Posts: 19
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
I have honestly not been impressed with any of the red fleshed apple varieties. Scarlet Surprise and Pink Pearl taste okay but are tart and relatively bland in flavor. Scarlet Surprise is also quite juicy and I have made an okay pink cider out of it but nothing to rave about. These are okay as novelty items but not of any real value when it comes to flavor. I have tasted several others and they are typically even more tart and not as palatable as those two. I guess you could say, they all make me yawn when it comes to real flavor, which is what I am after.


Sun Nov 24, 2013 5:51 pm
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Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:03 pm
Posts: 11
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
Do they have many red fleshed varieties at the scion wood exchange? If not, would you mind bringing the Grenadine scion to the exchange, John? Thank you.


Sun Nov 24, 2013 10:20 pm
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1314
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
They do have several red-fleshed varieties at the scion exchange. My section of grenadine isn't very big. It's a very small part of the tree, so I don't think I have any scions to bring in.
John S
PDX OR


Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:42 pm
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Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:03 pm
Posts: 11
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
that's okay John. ill get it somehow. when do you have another walk through to view your fruit trees again... :lol: I have lots and lots of varieties of fruit so I think ill be okay. I grafted about 40 different varieties of apples onto my apple tree to try and also about 30 varieties of plum grafted onto my plum tree to try. love my fruit! happy hunting.


Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:43 am
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1314
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
The walk throughs are always mentioned in your copy of the Pome News. I did one about 4-5 years ago, so I'll probably do another in about that much time.
John S
PDX OR


Thu Nov 28, 2013 12:02 pm
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Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2010 4:30 pm
Posts: 8
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
There is a lot of negative stuff about blood apples out there. If I remember right, the Orangepippin site is especially down on them. They just haven't tried enough, or good examples. As a group, they definitely have some issues, and breeding of them is in it's infancy. Aside from new releases and Etter's stuff, I think they're probably all more like chance seedlings, or at least not far removed from that.

Adequate warmth and sun are probably necessary for good ripening and internal color. I have quite a few of the etter varieties. The one that greenmantle named pink parfait is probably the best when all cultural, storage and eating traits are considered. It is not nearly as red as some of the others, having mottled pink and white flesh, but it has a really great texture, is not inclined to go mealy as some are, and while the flavor lacks the intensity of the more pigmented ones, it is very nice like honey with a little berry flavor maybe. It also has higher sugars. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that greater pigmentation generally brings with it, lower sugar, higher acidity and tendency to go down in texture as it ripens or is stored. Not to say that those traits can't be bred out of while retaining the red flesh, but it might take some generations. Who knows till we get there.

There are many red fleshed breeding programs at work and some releases. I'm breeding them on a micro-scale. They are the apple of the future, just like Etter said, he was just ahead of his time. When people bite into one, they are always delighted, often even if the texture isn't perfect, something people are generally totally fixated on to the exclusion of almost everything else! So we'll be seeing more and they'll be in stores before too long.

Grenadine is intensely flavored, but it goes quite mealy most years here in Northern California. Rubaiyat seems like a more refined apple, has intense red flesh (photo here: http://turkeysong.wordpress.com/2013/03 ... -20122013/ ) It still tends to go mealy in my experience though. Christmas pink was very good this year, but it was oddly very early. Other years it has been nothing to write home about, but it also just started bearing. It is also lightly pigmented, but quite tasty. Similar texture to pink parfait, which = awesome. More acidic and lower sugar than pink parfait. CP and Rubaiyat both tend to drop when or before ripe. Pink Parfait hangs well and my last one is still hanging on the tree now after multiple nights below 20 degrees in december. I ate one less than a week ago and it was excellent off the tree around the solstice. I got maypole because I heard it was good, but it wasn't very good this year. might make a good cider apple at best and not very red.

You never know what's going to be good in your area until someone tests it. I say grow a bunch of them and be prepared to cull most of them out. Substandard fruit can make excellent jelly with a beautiful color and nice flavor. I made a killer red apple jelly with saffron this year using mealy apples. Oh, and the juice is awesome! Blood apples have already moved out of the range of novelty and are going to sweep the market if someone can release something half way decent soon, especially with the antioxidant craze currently afoot. Anyone who doesn't know that just hasn't bit into the right one yet. Believe me, I'm picky enough to know :)


Thu Dec 26, 2013 5:24 am
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1314
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
I love the individual reports like Steven e just did. Jim from Vancouver Wa mentioned that some pomegranates do well in his yard, and others poorly. Fuzzy kiwis do well here, not so well in Seattle. Hardy kiwis do well here, but not in So Cal. Most Euro eggplants don't do well here, but they'd be great in Sacramento. Grenadine isn't mealy here, but it is biennial and this is an off year. That local knowledge is very valuable. Great post!
John S
PDX OR


Thu Dec 26, 2013 2:19 pm
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Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2010 4:30 pm
Posts: 8
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
I think it's important for us to report in too. I should have said more about my climate. I'm between coastal and inland california. It is pretty warm, with dry summers which makes for less disease generally. It can get hot, but not as hot as further into the interior. The heat makes some apples go mealy. It also probably goes a long way toward getting good red flesh pigmentation and ripening in some. I know red fleshed apple collector Nigel Deacon in the UK has some trouble with his not developing color inside. I'm not too far, or too different, than Ettersburg, where Albert Etter bred those apples. His Katherine apple is also turning out to be excellent BTW. It's keeping well, late hanging, flavorful and developing more in storage. Off the tree a few weeks to a month ago, it's crisp, crunchy and juicy. Now it's still a little crisp out of the fridge with very nice flavor.


Fri Dec 27, 2013 12:49 am
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Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2006 8:36 pm
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Location: Portland
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
The "blushing" apples are a particular favorite of mine. I became smitten upon trying a Pink Pearl at the HOS fruit tasting show a few years ago and promptly ordered a tree. I'm not normally a big apple fan, but the Pink Pearl's perfect sweet-tart blend had me hooked, plus it is just so darned pretty. Being the plant geek that I am, I did some research and found that the breeder of many red-fleshed apples was Albert Etter. Mr. Etter (circa 1900) was a plant breeder and orchardist in California who developed Pink Pearl and other apples. His history, and the effort to save his historic apples and breed new blushing apples from his lines can be read on the Greenmantle Nursery website http://www.greenmantlenursery.com/2008revision/fruit2008/etter-apples2008.htm.


Wed Jan 01, 2014 8:26 pm
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Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2012 1:10 pm
Posts: 17
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
What about Airlie's Red Flesh (aka Hidden Rose) ? This apple originated in Oregon near Corvallis (Airlie is the name of a town).

It has good reviews at Orange Pippin, and nice red flesh color. I was thinking about trying it, if I could find it.

http://www.orangepippin.com/apples/airlie-red-flesh

Salt Spring apple company is excited about it, too:
http://www.saltspringapplecompany.com/A ... -Flesh.htm

This might be the same as "Mountain Rose" of One Green World:
https://www.onegreenworld.com/Red%20Fle ... eM-26/198/

Gordon


Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:15 pm
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Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2010 4:30 pm
Posts: 8
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
I don't grow it Arlies Red Flesh, but hope to get it this year. The name hidden rose is a trademark name, which annoyingly confuses the naming issue. Arlies Red Flesh isn't maybe that saleable, but continually adding trademark names confuses consumers and enthusiasts... and really everyone. We have a similar problem with the Etter Reds from greenmantle. They only have Trademark names. Once they are known only under those names, greenmantle can try to claim a fee for the use of the name until the trademark fails to hold up in court, which does happen. My friends have a small commercial orchard and were contacted by the guy who claims a trademark on the name hidden rose requesting fees. Every variety should have one common, untrademarked name, and in my opinion, that name should be a classic name, not a number or whatever. Why? because every variety goes out of patent, and in the case of the apples trademarked by greenmantle, there is no patent anyway. People can keep adding trademarked names, but if the fruit has one common name, then there is at least an anchor in the sea. What will happen is that anyone who does not want to pay the trademark fee will just rename the apple leading ultimately to confusion. Also, as fruit enthusiasts, we should ideally use the common name and put trademark names as an after thought. Like I said, that's a problem if you want to sell an apple at the farmer's market and it's name is R2D2211p! This article on the abuse of plant trademark names is really outstanding and solidified my observations and limited knowledge. http://www.plantdelights.com/Article-Tr ... rticulture I'd love to hear from anyone that grows it. I've heard mixed reviews, but regionality is always good to keep in mind. (that link takes me to their home page for some reason. The article is the misuse of trademark names in horticulture under tab LEARN> PLANT ARTICLES> the URL seems right, but they are redirecting or something...?)


Wed Jan 29, 2014 4:34 pm
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:57 am
Posts: 1314
Location: Portland, OR
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
I agree steven, for example I call an apple cripps pink, which you can graft freely. The trademarked name is Pink lady. It's the same apple. Tastes good. Great keeper.

I have seen Airlie's red flesh for free many times at the HOS scion exchange/propagation fair.
John S
PDX OR


Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:21 pm
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Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 9:48 pm
Posts: 12
Post Re: Red fleshed apple varieties
Steven, What you're saying about trademarks really resonates with me. I'd like to see the article that you referenced but the website must have taken it down or something. One Green World has trade marked their Cornus mas but thankfully they still occasionally have the true name in the description. Yellow is Yantarny, Sunrise is Marina, Red Star is Vidubetskii, etc. This could really get confusing all across the board.


Thu Jan 30, 2014 11:33 pm
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