November

  • Harvest all fruit; do not leave mummies in trees
  • Continue to rake and compost leaves
  • Destroy all diseased fruit
  • Cultivate around plums, cherries, and peaches to discourage brown rot
  • Plant garlic for harvest next August
  • Mulch around berries for winter protection
  • Tie red raspberry canes to wires; prune to 1 foot above wire or wrap cane around top wire
  • Best time to transplant trees and shrubs
  • Prune roses to 3 feet to prevent wind damage
  • Cover rhubarb and asparagus beds with strawy manure
  • Use winter cover crop, or mulches, or fir boughs to prevent soil compaction and erosion control
  • Good time to apply lime if needed (see October)
  • Remove cardboard bands (codling moth control) when last fruit is harvested from apple and pear trees, destroy bands
  • Protect lower portion of HAYWARD Kiwi with insulation; they go dormant from tip to base, an early hard freeze may kill at ground level
  • After plants are dormant and soil cold, apply a thick (2-6 inch) layer of mulch, rotted manure, compost, mushroom compost, or yard debris compost, helps to moderate soil temperature, retain moisture, delay spring bud break
  • Check moisture around plants near foundations and under eaves, water if necessary
  • Cut back chrysanthemums to within 6 inches after the last flowers fade, will bloom in spring
  • Stay on slug patrol
  • Sow hardy annuals, candytuft, clarkia, larkspur, linaria, and wild flower seed mixes
  • Take currant and gooseberry cuttings and stick in ground
  • Clean garden tools for storage, oil moving parts
  • Sharpen pruning tools
  • Drain outside hoses and store in warm area
  • Plant spring-blooming bulbs such as tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, and snow drops
  • Record first frost
  • After first frost, dig dahlias and glads and store for winter
  • Winter scald occurs when temperatures rise, causing sap to rise, then it freezes, killing cambium, can be lethal or on west side of plant, foam pipe insulation, bubble wrap or tree wrap can help prevent scald
  • Protect cold-sensitive small plants with row covers, i.e., Reemay, Agronet or Frost Blanket
  • Protect roses by hilling up 12 inches of soil around stems
  • Reduce wind chill with a 4-6 sided enclosure made with tall stakes and tied burlap