Apple Bagging Report

Here in Idaho we do have problems with codling moth, and a few fungal problems too! I have tried for seven years to get more non-wormy fruit. I have failed all but 2 years. Often having 90+% wormy apples! Last year I sprayed every 2 weeks with various chemicals; Diazinon, Malathion, Combination fruit tree spray, Neem, Copper Soap Spray. For…

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How Good are Apples for You?

You’ve heard, an apple a day will keep the doctor away. While it will certainly take more than a daily apple to keep you healthy, it is a step in the right direction. Apples are delicious, easy to carry for snacking, low in calories, a natural mouth freshener, and they are still very inexpensive. Apples are source of both soluble…

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Early Americans knew that Apples were not just for Eating

Agriculture Yearbook 1925, USDA, Page 120. The first immigrants to the new world brought seeds from their homes. Hence the first fruits grown by them were seedlings. As the apple, it was seemingly prized for cider above all else. At least it is recorded that as early as 1674 a single individual in Virginia made 20 butts (a cask holding…

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Bagging Apples

Thanks to Quinten K. Fadness and his article¬†“Growing Worm-Free, Spray-Free Apples”¬†in Pome News, Volume XXV, No.2, Spring, 2000 and to Ted Swensen I now have Worm- Free, Spray-Free Apples. This has been my lifetime happiest gardening and orcharding experience. As an uncertified organic home gardener I now proudly store or supply family, friends and Halfway House, with prize bug free…

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Bagged Apples

This year’s crop of Belle de Boskoop bagged apples was absolutely free of codling moth damage. The problem of apple scab, however, was only partially stopped, if at all. Since my wife and I had planned a 45 day vacation, exploring the national parks in the western U.S., I knew that the tree would get no attention for most of…

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Growing Worm-Free, Spray-Free Apples

Over the years, I have experimented with alternate methods of controlling the codling moth and apple maggot fly in our apple orchard. It seems the traditionally accepted method of control is an application of spray every seven to 10 days, starting in June and continuing into September. Since I have a number of trees and used a three gallon hand…

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