Are your Seedlings too Tall?

If you raise plants from seed indoors, you may often find that they are tall and spindly. There are a couple things you can do if your plants are this way. One reason may be the lack of adequate light. If possible, increase the lighting. Another reason is that the seedlings are sheltered and do not receive the buffeting effect…

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Black Currants

It’s good to have black currants growing in your back garden because they are so versatile for desserts and meat sauces, jams, jellies, juice and liqueur. The fruit has great color and tangy flavor and is an excellent source of vitamin C (4 times that of citrus or blueberries) and antioxidants. Black currants are best cooked either in the microwave…

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Clay Pot Irrigation

Last year an HOS friend, Wilma McNulty, gave me a photocopy of an article on clay pot irrigation that appeared in the Pome News some years ago. It was adapted FROM additions by Ted Swensen for Pome News. David Bainbridge of the University of California tried a variation on an old irrigation method he found in a 2,100-yearold text, Fan…

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Larry McGraw, HOS Founder & Friend

On January 29, 2005, Larry McGraw passed away at the age of 82, at Keizer, Oregon, after several years of battling cancer. Born in Huntington, Oregon, Larry was the eldest of 14 children. After graduating from Wallowa High School, he joined the Air Force and served as a B-24 belly gunner in World War II and later in the Korean…

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Composting & Compost Tea for Disease Control

Composting is the biological decomposition of organic material under controlled conditions. The heat generated by decomposer microorganisms during composting can destroy most pathogens, weed seeds, and invertebrates. Beneficial microorganisms inhabiting some composts control diseases. For disease suppression compost must have a diversity of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and nematodes. Compost Starting Materials The greater the variety and size of materials the…

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Composting for the Garden vs. Home Orchard

Do not let the following discourage you from composting or just throwing plant material on the soil. Any organic matter added is better than none at all. As more knowledge is gained from nature we can then work with nature to maintain more of a natural balance. Ingham’s work at Oregon State University and Shigo’s work in Vermont, plus others,…

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Fifteen Reasons For Mason Bees: Let HOS Be Your Supply

If you have any apricot, peach, plum, cherry, apple, pear or other plants that require pollination in the early spring, you will want to consider mason bees for your pollinators. Here are fifteen reasons why: MASON BEES: are solitary, only one bee per nest not hundreds. do not sting. are early spring bees, about the time peaches and cherries bloom….

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Mason Bee Pictures

Mason Bee House